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Gluteal Tendonitis

The buttocks are made up of three muscle groups called the gluteal muscles: the gluteus maximus, the gluteus medius, and the gluteus minimus. The gluteal tendons are strong, fibrous tissues that connect the gluteal muscles to the hip bones. These tendons can become inflamed, resulting in a condition called gluteal tendonitis or gluteal tendinopathy. Tiny tears in the tendons can also develop due to chronic wear and tear over time. This condition can cause significant hip pain and limit physical activity

Gluteal Tendonitis Hero Image 2

The buttocks are made up of three muscle groups called the gluteal muscles: the gluteus maximus, the gluteus medius, and the gluteus minimus. The gluteal tendons are strong, fibrous tissues that connect the gluteal muscles to the hip bones. These tendons can become inflamed, resulting in a condition called gluteal tendonitis or gluteal tendinopathy. Tiny tears in the tendons can also develop due to chronic wear and tear over time. This condition can cause significant hip pain and limit physical activity.

What causes Gluteal Tendonitis?

Gluteal tendonitis is usually caused by overuse of the gluteal muscles, putting athletes at greater risk for this injury. Another contributing factor is muscle fatigue, which can create an imbalance among the gluteal muscles that support the hip.

Gluteal tendonitis is most common in these sports:

• Soccer
• Tennis
• Cycling
• Running

Symptoms

Gluteal tendonitis often causes pain and weakness in the buttocks and side of the hip. Other common symptoms include:

• Pain that gets worse with activity, especially running or jumping
• Stiffness, especially at night and first thing in the morning

When to see a doctor

Most cases of gluteal tendonitis will resolve with home care. But if your pain persists and you have other symptoms, such as radiating pain and numbness, you should make an appointment to see your doctor. At your visit, your doctor may ask about your injury, the sports you play, and if you have had previous injuries to your hip. This information will help your doctor make a diagnosis.

Your doctor will conduct a physical examination, looking for signs of loss of range of motion, muscle tightness or weakness, and tenderness. Diagnostic tests, such as an ultrasound scan or MRI, may be ordered to help evaluate the extent of your injury and rule out other conditions.

Non-operative treatment

It’s important to give your gluteal tendons time to recover by avoiding sports that make the pain worse. Additional conservative treatments may include:

• Applying ice or cold packs to reduce swelling and pain
• Taking anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen) for pain
• Stretching and strengthening exercises
• Consulting with a physical therapist

You can also ry these exercises at home:

Gluteal Tendonitis

 

Recovery

Athletes can expect to return to sport quickly, but starting with a lower intensity than prior to the injury. Follow your doctor or physical therapist’s guidance on how to slowly ramp back up to your previous level, and stop if activity causes pain. Stretching and strengthening exercises will help improve your range of motion and strength, as well as help to prevent re-injury.

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