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Hamstring Tendonitis of the Hip

The hamstrings are a group of muscles and tendons at the back of your upper leg. There are three muscles: the semitendinosus, the semimembranosus, and the biceps femoris. These are very strong muscles that are essential for jumping, running, and walking. Tendons attach the hamstring muscles to the hip bone, the shaft of the femur (the upper leg bone), and the top of the tibia and fibula (the lower leg bones). In sports, the hamstring tendons can become painfully inflamed, a condition that is called hamstring tendonitis.

Hamstring Tendonitis of the Hip Hero Image 2

The hamstrings are a group of muscles and tendons at the back of your upper leg. There are three muscles: the semitendinosus, the semimembranosus, and the biceps femoris. These are very strong muscles that are essential for jumping, running, and walking. Tendons attach the hamstring muscles to the hip bone, the shaft of the femur (the upper leg bone), and the top of the tibia and fibula (the lower leg bones). In sports, the hamstring tendons can become painfully inflamed, a condition that is called hamstring tendonitis.

What causes Hamstring Tendonitis of the Hip?

Hamstring tendonitis is an inflammation of the hamstring tendons. It usually results from overuse or not stretching before and after you run or play. Hamstring tendonitis is also more common among older athletes and in running and cutting sports.

Hamstring tendonitis is common in these sports:
• Cross country
• Track
• Soccer
• Baseball
• Tennis

Symptoms

The main symptom experienced by athletes with hamstring tendonitis is pain in the places where the tendons attach the hamstring muscles to bones in the leg and hip. You may feel:

• Pain either at the buttocks, along your hamstring, or at your knee
• Pain that is stronger when you do a move or stretch that activates your hamstrings
• Hamstring muscle weakness

When to see a doctor

Make an appointment to see your doctor when you have pain at your buttocks, along your hamstring, or at your knee that doesn’t get better over time. Hamstring tendonitis may sometimes be confused with other conditions, like sciatica, so it’s important to get a correct diagnosis.

In order to make a diagnosis, your doctor will ask you about the sports you play and request that you perform certain stretches or moves and describe if you feel pain. To confirm the diagnosis and rule out other conditions, your doctor may order an x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan.

Non-operative treatment

Treatment for hamstring tendonitis is always non-operative. Conservative treatments may include:

• Rest from your sport and walking for long periods
• Icing the area where you feel pain
• Stretching at home, following your doctor’s recommendations
• Physical therapy while you rest from your sport and as you begin to get more active

You can also try these exercises at home:

Hamstring Injuries

Recovery

Full recovery from hamstring tendonitis can take up to six weeks. Most athletes feel substantially better after just several days of rest, but it’s important to take it slow. Don’t restart practicing your sport until you’re given the green light by your doctor or physical therapist. Because getting back into the game too soon makes your hamstring tendons vulnerable to re-injury, allowing for the necessary time to heal will be important in the long run.

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